Tested – AMD Ryzen 7 6800U: Providing amazing performance at just 28W of power

AMD recently announced the new Ryzen 6000 series mobile processors and with us today, is a laptop that is equipped with the new Ryzen 7 6800U. In today’s video, we’re going to briefly go through the new Ryzen 6000 series mobile processors in general, then test the performance of this new chip. Let’s begin.

The new Ryzen 6000 series processors are based on AMD’s Zen3+ architecture and fabricated using TSMC’s 6nm process technology. The Ryzen 6000 series splits into 3 different series – the high-performance H-series which goes up to 45W, and this series also includes the HX variants that can go beyond 45W of power.

Then we have the HS-series which is a step down in terms of TDP, down to 35W. While the core specs of the H and HS series remained the same, the TDP differs. In turn, the TDP will dictate how much the processor can boost in terms of performance, corresponding to the laptop’s design. A leaner laptop like the ROG Zephyrus G14 would be more suitable for the HS-series while the H-series will be perfect for the bulkier ROG Strix SCAR laptops that can fit a larger cooler.

Moving down in terms of TGP, we have the U-series. There are only two variants available – either the Ryzen 5 6600U or the Ryzen 7 6800U, both rated for 15W to 28W of power.

One thing I truly appreciate is that AMD kept everything as simple as possible by keeping the number of variants as low as possible. This is something that cannot be said about the blue team, though.

With that out of the way, let’s proceed with the performance test. We have the ASUS Zenbook S 13 OLED UM5402 with us and it is equipped with the Ryzen 7 6800U with 16GB of LPDDR5 at 6400MHz. Before we proceed to do any tests, we’ll have to toggle the power profile to “performance” by hitting Fn + F.

And here are some screenshots of the synthetic benchmarks that we’ve done. In general, the CPU performance isn’t as good as the Intel Core i7-1260P and that’s okay because GPU performance is magnificent on Ryzen 7 6800U. This laptop also has an OLED screen with a high resolution of 2880×1800 pixels – and that is 2.5x more pixels than the standard 1080p.

Yet at Genshin Impact, at the lowest graphical settings, it can maintain 60fps for most of the time. I’m impressed, honestly. I also changed the render resolution from 0.8 to 1.0 and the frame rate instantly dipped to about 40-ish fps which I think is still fantastic – but I’ll keep the render resolution at 0.8 since I can’t see the difference anyway.

As for GTA V, at the lowest graphical settings, it is very smooth and can maintain above 30fps at all times. It never stuttered and the entire experience was just magnificent.

Then comes the big daddy Halo Infinite. I tried playing this game on the Intel Iris Xe and it failed to run since the frame rate was always below 30fps and the entire gameplay experience was stuttery. However, on the Ryzen 7 6800U, the Radeon 680M integrated GPU can churn out more than 30fps all the time – yet it never stuttered.

This is the best gaming experience I’ve gotten from a thin and light laptop so far – and I even tried playing it on battery too! Turned out, there is no performance dip while playing on battery and the performance remains the same – above 30fps all the time.

As for the temperature though, it’s no surprise that it can hit about 85° at most. It’s still within the safety limits, and I’m surprised that AMD didn’t allow the chip to boost even further and hit 90°C or 95°C. I mean, they have the headroom to do so, they just didn’t utilize it.

So, that’s our performance test of AMD’s latest Ryzen 7 6800U. I’m truly impressed by the performance it is able to provide (even on battery).

By the way, watch our review of the ASUS ZenBook 13 OLED UM5302 here.

Where to buy the ASUS ZenBook 13 OLED UM5302? (Affiliate links)

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